Tag Archives: Columbia University

Columbia Students Outreach at Manhattan School of Math and Science

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CIAN students Tingjun Chen, Craig Gutterman,  Yishen Huang, and Alex Loh, as well as organizers from the school.

On Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015, Columbia University EE Ph.D. students participated in an outreach event with high school students from the Robotics and Engineering Group at the Manhattan School of Math and Science in East Harlem.
CIAN students Tingjun Chen, Craig Gutterman, and Alex Loh, from the Wireless and Mobile Networking Lab, talked about broad concepts of the Internet along with basic concepts of wireless communications. CIAN student Yishen Huang, from the Lightwave Research Lab, discussed lasers, and the principles of optical communications. The high school students showed great interest in the topics and interacted actively with CIAN students. We hope that the students may have realized how beautiful science can be, and that they walked away with an increased interest in studying science in college.
This event was hosted by Mr. Umit Kenis from the Manhattan School of Math and Science.

 

Updates from the Lab: Coordinated MultiPoint with Joint Transmission

About the Author: Marc Kurtz

CIAN Undergraduate student and former participant in the CIAN Integrated Optics for Undergraduates Program, Marc Kurtz, research was recently accepted for publication. The paper will be published in the journal Performance Evaluation, Special Issue from IFIP Performance 2015. Marc’s mentor, Dr. Guy Grebla will be presenting their project at the 33rd International Symposium on Computer Performance, Modeling, Measurements, and Evaluation in Sydney, Australia October 19-21, 2015.

In Summer 2014 Marc was selected to participated in Dr. Gil Zussman’s WimNet Lab at Columbia University under Dr. Zussman’s and Dr. Guy Grebla’s mentorship. After the summer Marc went on to receive an Undergraduate Research Fellowship and continued his research into the school year. Marc will begin his graduate work in Electrical Engineering at The Cooper Union. He’ll also be working with a start-up company called MMT Diagnostics.

Marc Kurtz WimNet

Marc Kurtz poses in the Wireless and Mobile Networking Lab (WiMNet) at Columbia University where he performed his research.

Coordinated Multipoint with Joint Transmission

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CTY Engineering and Applied Science Day @Columbia University

This gallery contains 19 photos.

On September 20, 2014 gifted students from the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth attended Engineering and Applied Science Day at Columbia University. In sessions taught throughout the day, students and their parents learned about the inner workings of the internet and learned about the … Continue reading

Engineering Explorations Day @Columbia University

On March 29, 2014, in collaboration with the Columbia University chapter of the Society of Women Engineers, students at Columbia University participated in a workshop for middle school age girls as part of the spring semester’s program “Engineering Explorations Experience.”

We adjusted our Jell-O waveguide demo to include in the lesson more information on the science of fluorescence and the Bohr model of an atom. The students’ teachers also attended the talk and came to ask us after how to make the demo for their other classes. Overall I’d say it was a successful day for Jell-O ing!

CIAN students Cathy Chen and Lee Zhu gave the lectures, select pictures can be seen in the gallery below:

CIAN LECTURE SERIES WEBINAR – Dr. Keren Bergman

Silicon Photonic Interconnection Networks in High Performance Data Centers

Date: December 12, 2014
Time: 11:00am Pacific Time (12pm AZT, 2pm ET, 1pm CT)

Register or Login to the Webinar

kerenBiography

Dr. Keren Bergman
Chair of Electrical Engineering
Columbia University

Keren Bergman is the Charles Batchelor Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University where she also directs the Lightwave Research Laboratory (http://lightwave.ee.columbia.edu/). She leads multiple research programs on optical interconnection networks for advanced computing systems, data centers, optical packet switched routers, and chip multiprocessor nanophotonic networks-on-chip. Dr. Bergman holds a Ph.D. from M.I.T. and is a Fellow of the IEEE and of the OSA.

Abstract

As future data centers aim to realize scalable performance the challenge of energy efficient data movement rather than computation is paramount. Silicon photonics has emerged as perhaps the most promising technology to address these challenges by providing ultra-high bandwidth density communication capabilities that is essentially distance independent. Recent advances in chip-scale silicon photonic technologies have created the potential for developing optical interconnection networks that offer highly energy efficient communications and significantly improve computing performance-per-Watt. This talk will explore the design of silicon photonic interconnected architectures for data centers and their impact on the system level performance.

Please register for “SILICON PHOTONIC INTERCONNECTION NETWORKS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE DATA CENTERS” on Dec 12, 2014 at 2:00 PM EST at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4100597092559435265

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Register now!

2014 12-12 Keren Bergman Flyer

Girls Science Day Take II @Columbia University

On Saturday, November 15, 2014 Columbia hosted middle school girls from in and around New York City in the annual Girls Science Day. So what happens when you mix 40 middle schoolers, laser pointers, and fluorescent JELL-O?

We had a great plan- 40 minutes, we would explain the basic properties of an atom and how it relates to fluorescence, explain Snell’s law, give them a JELL-O waveguide,  and have them find the critical angle of the JELL-O waveguide. But, as we all know…even the best of plans can derail a bit…

Then came the critical question: “Can we touch it?” followed closely by “Can we eat it?!” And while Cathy quickly stopped them from eating the Jell-O, the touching of the waveguides soon turned into a bit of a JELL-O war. Clean up took a while, and  while our waveguides may not have stayed intact, the event was fun and informative. And we have learned for next year’s Girls Science Day to tell them not to throw the JELL-O when we instructed them to touch it.

Girls Science Day was hosted by Cathy Chen, Atiyah Ahsan, and Jelena Marasevic.  Approximately 40 students attended the event on Columbia University’s campus.

Select pictures can be seen below:

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CIAN Student Webinar Talk Series – Atiyah Ahsan, Columbia University

Advanced Optical Performance Monitoring for Next-Generation Dynamic Optical Networks

Date: Friday, September 26, 2014
Time: 1:30pm Pacific Time

Login to the Webinar.*

Abstract

Ever-growing demand for speed and bandwidth and increasing energy consumption in today’s networks are driving the need for intelligent next-generation networking architectures that can overcome fundamental spectral and energy limitations. Metro-only internet traffic in particular is experiencing unprecedented growth and is projected to exceed long-haul traffic by 40% in 2017; current static peak capacity provisioned networks are ill-equipped to address such “bursty” traffic patterns. Dynamic optical networking, where bandwidth is allocated on-demand in the physical layer in response to changing traffic demands and network conditions, is a promising solution to address these challenges. Rapidly changing network configurations, however, cause unpredictable transmission impairments and result in network instability. Real-time awareness of the state of the physical layer is necessary for managing signal quality and reliability in a dynamic network and can be achieved through ubiquitous distribution of advanced optical performance monitors in a network.

Delay-line-interferometer (DLI) based optical-signal-to-noise (OSNR) monitor is a good candidate for ubiquitous monitoring as it is cost-effective and supports multiple advanced modulation formats. Its greatest drawback is that its measurements are modulation-format and bit-rate dependent, rendering it ineffective in future networks operating in a mixed line rate and modulation formats framework. In our recent work we demonstrated that by using pilot-tones, modulation-format and bit-rate awareness is realized in the monitor. Autonomous signal quality decisions, even in presence of modulation-dependent cross-talk, is achieved facilitating scalable cross-layer impairment aware routing.

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Biography

Atiyah Ahsan
Ph.D. Candidate
CIAN Graduate Student
Columbia University

Atiyah Ahsan received the B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering (summa cum laude, thesis with highest honors) from Tufts University, Boston and the M.Sc. degree from Columbia University, New York in 2010 and 2012 respectively. From May 2012 to January 2013, she worked as a student collaborator on a project led by Dr. Daniel Kilper at Bell Labs Alcatel Lucent. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Columbia University Lightwave Research Laboratory under the advisement of Professor Keren Bergman. Her research is focused on advanced optical performance monitoring techniques and cross-layer architectures for next-generation dynamic access and metro-networks.

*link will not work until date & time of webinar

If you missed Atiyah Ahsan’s talk, see it below!