CIAN Student Webinar Series – Lawrence Tzuang, Cornell

Photonic Transitions Enabling Effective Magnetic Field for Light

Date: Friday, April 17, 2015
Time: 11:30am Pacific Time, 2:30pm Eastern Time

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Abstract

Photons are neutral particles that do not interact directly with a magnetic field. However, an effective magnetic field for photons do exist if the phase of light would change with its propagating direction. This direction-dependent phase indicates the presence of an effective magnetic field as shown for electrons experimentally in the Aharonov-Bohm experiment. In this talk, I will demonstrate our recent experiments toward realizing such an effective magnetic field for photons in an on-chip Ramsey type interferometer using silicon photonics. This interferometer scheme has been traditionally used to probe the phase of atoms in a specific atomic states, and here it is applied to probe the photon phase in different photonic states. The non-reciprocal phase achieved is comparable with common monolithically-integrated magneto-optical (MO) materials.

Biography

TzuangLawrence D. Tzuang
Ph.D. Candidate, Cornell University
Cornell Nanophotonics Group (Lipson)

Lawrence graduated from National Tsing-Hua University in 2007 with a B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering. He received his M.S. degree in Electronics Engineering in 2009 from National Taiwan University, where he studied light transmission through periodic metallic holes and gratings. He is currently pursuing his PhD degree in Electrical & Computer Engineering. At Cornell, he explores the theory and applications of electrically-induced photonic transitions on the silicon photonics platform.

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